How Your Perception of Your Long-Term Success On The Guitar Effects Your Short-Term Guitar Playing

How Long Do You Think You Will Play The Guitar For?

This questions holds a small idea that has a profound effect on your short and long-term guitar playing.

 

If you do not believe you will play the guitar for a long-term, or you are thinking to yourself you want to “just try it out”. This attitude may result in you doing less practice than if you felt committed to play the guitar.

A lot of people will subconsciously think about this question without truly asking themselves to get a solid answer.

The interesting thing is, while you may be doing the same amount of practice as someone who is committed to learning the guitar in the long term. Your result can be affected by as much as 400% even with the same amount of time committed.

This is why it’s important that you have the right thinking before going ahead with lessons.

If you are thinking, am I going to stick at this? Maybe I will just try it for a couple of weeks, or a couple of lessons.

 

That type of thinking could be the difference between you being able to play the guitar and doing all the things you want to be able to do it on vs never picking a guitar back up again after the first few weeks.

Aim For The Moon

It can also make the difference between you wowing people with your progress or getting stuck at the beginner phase.

“Shoot for the moon, and if you miss. You will still land amongst the stars." By Norman Vincent Paele. While the quote isn’t astronomically correct. It is still a great lesson is what can happen when you aim high.

 

The higher you aim, the more likely it is that you will get further with your guitar playing. Perhaps even surprise yourself with the result.

 

How you see yourself as guitar player

 

How you see yourself currently, the amount of effort you think you can put in. Where you think you can get to with your guitar playing. All contribute towards how good you get at playing the guitar in both the short term and long term.

 

If you struggle to see yourself as being able to play the guitar, and only half try when you start, then you are a lot more likely to struggle and give up prematurely.

 

For students who learn quickly initially, you may think of yourself as having natural talent. However, the thing to remember is that no matter where you get to in what space of time. It’s the amount of effort you put in and the enjoyment you get out of it is the most important thing.

 

Even if you find it easy in the beginning, you are bound to hit some challenges later on down the line. Being able accept your limitations and work hard to get over those challenges will make you a better guitar player overall.

 

Work out what you want to do in the long term

Having an idea or a vision of where you see yourself with your guitar playing will make the whole learning process a lot more fun and interesting. It also helps you with figuring what things you should be learning on the guitar. This is especially important if you don’t have a guitar teacher. If you have a teacher, you can tell him exactly what you want to do. If it’s being able to play in front of thousands of people or play with your family at Christmas. Letting them know will help them guide you along the right path.

 

About guitar teacher and author:

Darryl Powis has been studying education in the quest of being the top guitar teacher in London England, so that he can provide the best quality guitar lessons possible for acoustic guitar players in London. Their acoustic guitar lessons are great for hobbyist and advanced players in London.

 

If you are serious and thinking that you will keep trying and keep going no matter what, then you are a lot more likely to show more commitment to practising. And even more focus as well. Having a vision of where you ultimately want to be with your guitar playing will help you a lot with making progress.